May 20 2012

“To Lie And Shame The Race” | Jack. Michael. Muhammad.

Category: Books,Justice,VideosSeven @ 1:46 am

In their fourth series of educational short films, The Michael Jackson Academia Project finds some interesting correlations in regards to the deliberate and systemic destruction of Michael Jackson’s public image. These latest MJAP videos suggest that the methods of personal and professional destruction used against Michael Jackson were the same as those used against Muhammad Ali, Jack Johnson, and others.

Michael himself mentioned Jack Johnson in an interview with Jesse Jackson (from 4:47-5:27), when Jesse asked Michael how he dealt with the pain of the allegations flung at him. Michael was very aware of this pattern of systemic destruction of successful black men in America. He had mentioned it in various interviews such as the aforementioned, and expressed his awareness of it and his frustration with it in many of his songs.

“To Lie And Shame The Race” | Jack. Michael. Muhammad. Chapter One:

“To Lie And Shame The Race” | Jack. Michael. Muhammad. Chapter Two:


Recommended reading:

Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson by Geoffrey C. Ward (2004). Unforgivable Blackness, a film directed by Ken Burns, is also available on DVD from PBS, along with a study guide for teachers.

Muhammad Ali: His Life and Times by Thomas Hauser (1992).

Huey P. Newton: The Radical Theorist By Judson L. Jeffries (2002).

I also encourage you to read Dr. Sylvia Martin’s ‘The Roots and Routes of Michael Jackson’s Global Identity‘, just published in March of 2012.

All of these resources will provide an important learning and teaching perspective in regards to the pattern of destruction brought upon these men once they became successful in a world whose ruling powers were determined to keep them “in their place” and if it could not do that, to destroy their professional and personal reputations in any way possible.

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Apr 01 2012

‘No more talking silence is more powerful’

Category: Books,MJ Quotes,PhotosSeven @ 9:34 pm

A UK-based book enthusiast has located a book from Michael’s vast collection which was on auction in LA previously. The book’s pages are annotated by Michael himself, who underlined some sentences and wrote his own notes in the margins.

Bookride.com says:

This year at auction in Los Angeles someone paid £8500 for a self-help book annotated by Michael Jackson. It was The 48 Laws Of Power by Robert Greene (Viking 1998) and without the Prince of Pop’s marginal notes it can be bought for less than £1. Bonham’s catalogue entry goes thus:

“… a number of pages with passages underlined and annotated in various pens by Michael, providing an insight into his view of the world, with comments such as ‘Make yourself respected, a God Demands Worship‘ and ‘No more talking silence is more powerful‘, and ‘you create your own circumstances even in the manner in which you are treated and looked upon‘, and ‘deer are special because they hide if they walked the streets like dogs no one would care‘ and ‘the moon comes every night so people don’t care to look to the heavens Haley’s Comet, the fact it comes once in a lifetime makes it important…

The Bookride piece goes on to describe The 48 Laws Of Power as “somewhat cynical and ruthless for a self-help book“. The book is pretty much described that same way at Amazon.com:   Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this piercing work distills three thousand years of the history of power in to forty-eight well explicated laws. As attention-grabbing in its design as it is in its content, this bold volume outlines the laws of power in their unvarnished essence, synthesizing the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun-tzu, Carl von Clausewitz, and other great thinkers. 

The remainder of Bookride’s commentary is rather uncomplimentary though, first referring to Michael Jackson as the “Prince of Pop” rather than the King of Pop as he was known, and further using the  racist moniker “Jacko” in reference to him. Speaking of cynical and ruthless, the book certainly could not be more cynical and ruthless than this book enthusiast’s comments about MJ. Regardless though, the book and Michael’s annotations on its pages are interesting:

Page from 'The 48 Laws of Power', annotated by MJ (click for larger image)

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{ Thanks to Karen O’Halloran for finding and sharing this item! -Seven }

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Mar 26 2012

1000 days, 33 months. They still don’t care about us.

Category: Books,Humanitarian,Justice,Photos,VideosSeven @ 6:57 pm

On March 21st, it had been 1000 days since Michael Jackson died. Fans from 42 countries contributed to send 1000 roses to his resting place at Forest Lawn and those roses were taken inside to where his body lay. On March 25th, it had been 33 months since Michael died, that grim reminder that comes around the 25th of every month now, a date many would rather forget or better yet, turn back time to before it happened.

Below is a photo of the roses Michael’s fans sent to his resting place in remembrance of him on that 1000-day anniversary:

1000 roses from 42 countries for Michael

But amidst all his fans remembering Michael on these key dates, the national attention surrounding the murder of young Trayvon Martin was increasing, the chorus of demands for justice growing ever-louder by the day. I could not ignore this. I know what Michael would feel about this: heartbroken, and sad that some of the same hatred and stereotyping he endured during his own life is still par for the course in our society, and that a young innocent boy needlessly died because of it. Nothing’s changed in that regard. This latest blatant injustice serves to remind us just how much and for how long things have not changed. I wonder if Michael would have gone to the family, asking if he could help; if he would speak out and if so, what he would say. Michael can’t speak about this now but I can, and so I am.

Michael Jackson fought against just these types of injustices all his life. He fought against them on his own behalf and he fought against them just as much on behalf of all humanity, through passionate philanthropy, music, film, speeches. But nothing’s changed.

They still don’t care about us

After Trayvon Martin was shot, police didn’t even bother to identify him. For three days he lay in a morgue tagged as “John Doe“, even though police had his cell phone and could easily have identified him. They just didn’t care. They could have also spoken with Trayvon’s girlfriend, the last person he spoke to before being accosted and shot by Zimmerman, but they didn’t bother. They just didn’t care. They tested Trayvon Martin’s corpse for drugs and alcohol but oddly, they did not test his murderer for the same. They just didn’t care. A friend of George Zimmerman made the comment that George thought all this would “all just blow over.  In other words, Zimmerman thought that murdering a young black boy was no big deal. He just didn’t care.

Michael’s fans are demanding justice for Trayvon Martin:

The video above did not include the Change.org petition that has over 2 million signatures now demanding justice for this boy’s murder. You can sign that petition here if you haven’t already:

https://www.change.org/petitions/prosecute-the-killer-of-our-son-17-year-old-trayvon-martin

George Zimmerman wanted to be a cop. But he wasn’t. So he decided to just act like one, taking the law into his own hands in a deadly act of vigilantism. There are other groups that are inciting further acts of vigilantism in response to this one. That will not help. It will not turn out well and will only feed Zimmerman’s false story of himself as “victim” in this incident. The victim, as we know, is dead. Some people say Zimmerman can’t be a racist because he is partially Hispanic. But here’s the truth: Anyone can be a racist.

Zimmerman is on record as having pestered the 911 operators and the cops 47 times. Every “suspicious person” he called about was black. Zimmerman even called them about potholes in the road. One might think it would be illegal to waste 911 emergency workers’ time with calling about potholes, or at least unacceptable enough that they would ask him to stop calling them unless it was an emergency. Apparently they did not do so and thus I can only assume police and local 911 operators knew what he was doing and that they approved of his harrassing black people in his neighborhood.

Here is the 47 page history of Zimmerman’s 911 calls:

http://www.documentcloud.org/documents/327330-george-zimmerrman-911-call-history.html

No, it’s not about the damn hoodie

Geraldo Rivera insists that Treyvon got shot because he was wearing a hoodie. I don’t think so. Geraldo (or anyone else) citing the fact that Treyvon Martin was wearing a hoodie as the (or a) reason he was murdered is a weak and pretentious excuse that only serves to protect the behavior of the perpetrator (Zimmerman) from complete accountability. Whether Geraldo meant his statement that way, I do not know but I do know that is the end result of it. It serves to protect the shooter from his actions by blaming the victim.

This is just like saying a woman was raped because she wore a short skirt. Or, because she was walking on a certain street or walking at a certain time of day.

It doesn’t make a damn bit of difference. What all this is – is a way to blame the victim for the violent behavior of a criminal. And the victims who so typically get blamed for unprovoked violent criminal behavior against them are most often minorities: blacks, women, homosexuals, etc. This has been a shameful pattern for many decades in U.S. society.

I doesn’t matter what Treyvon was wearing or where he was walking. It doesn’t matter what a rape victim was wearing or where she was walking. It doesn’t matter if someone “looks gay” or not.  None deserve to be the target of a violent crime. Period. It’s called ‘human rights‘. If a non-white, or non-heterosexual, or non-male person were considered to have a full set of human rights, they would not be blamed for unprovoked violent crime against them. It is only when these people are deemed to possess an incomplete or non-existent set of human rights that such excuses are used against them while they are victims of unprovoked violence. And unfortunately that is most, if not all of the time in the United States.

What matters is that these crimes go unpunished while those responsible for enforcing the law flatly refuse to hold the criminals accountable for their behavior, often blaming the victim, then society joins them in that blame response – like Geraldo did with his comment about the hoodie.

George Zimmerman is still walking free. Treyvon Martin is dead and Geraldo Rivera is making excuses for the man who killed him. And this type of thing happens all over the U.S. every day. This particular case just happened to get on the national radar. There are many more that do not.

While the high and mighty and frankly rather pervertedly obsessed American Taliban in the U.S. attempt to completely control what women do with their uteruses beneath the guise of calling themselves “pro-life” — and beneath some twisted version of “religious freedom” (which in practice amounts to same religious oppression that they claim themselves the victim of), actual lives are prematurely ended or ruined every single day with a whole lot of impunity – completely unabated and most often, unnoticed.

I’m talking about rampant hate crime and epidemic human rights abuses. You’re black? You’re a target. You’re a woman? You’re a target. You’re gay? You’re a target. How many school kids have killed or died due to bullying because they’re gay or because they’re different in some other way? Why do so many rapes go unreported and/or unprosecuted? How many of our women in the U.S. Armed Services are sexually assaulted and raped by their own comrades, yet our military does nothing to punish the violent offenders instead threatening and coercing the victims to remain silent on the issue. This particular issue is an epidemic of human rights abuses right in our own military. And yet we somehow against all odds expect these violent offenders not to behave similarly against other innocents on foreign soil. And when they do, we act surprised!

Some current media efforts to smear Trayvon Martin greatly resemble tactics used against rape victims in how they attempt to show past associations, clothing the victim wore, etc. in a damaging light.

When is somebody going to worry about all this? The current pretenses are transparent and not salable. The truth is, they just don’t care.

Society and the justice system in the United States can only start truly saving lives and showing care when they stop blaming innocent victims for the criminals’ unprovoked violent behavior. I have yet to see that begin to happen in this country.

Remembering Kennedy’s words on the death of MLK

King and Kennedy

After Martin Luther-King was shot, Robert F. Kennedy gave an off-the-cuff speech April 4, 1968 in Indianapolis. Many people think this was one of the best speeches Kennedy ever made. Here is what Kennedy said:

Ladies and Gentlemen,

I’m only going to talk to you just for a minute or so this evening, because I have some – some very sad news for all of you – Could you lower those signs, please? – I have some very sad news for all of you, and, I think, sad news for all of our fellow citizens, and people who love peace all over the world; and that is that Martin Luther King was shot and was killed tonight in Memphis, Tennessee.

Martin Luther King dedicated his life to love and to justice between fellow human beings. He died in the cause of that effort. In this difficult day, in this difficult time for the United States, it’s perhaps well to ask what kind of a nation we are and what direction we want to move in. For those of you who are black – considering the evidence evidently is that there were white people who were responsible – you can be filled with bitterness, and with hatred, and a desire for revenge.

We can move in that direction as a country, in greater polarization – black people amongst blacks, and white amongst whites, filled with hatred toward one another. Or we can make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to understand, and to comprehend, and replace that violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread across our land, with an effort to understand, compassion, and love.

For those of you who are black and are tempted to be filled with hatred and mistrust of the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I would only say that I can also feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling. I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man.

But we have to make an effort in the United States. We have to make an effort to understand, to get beyond, or go beyond these rather difficult times.

My favorite poet was Aeschylus. And he once wrote:

Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget
falls drop by drop upon the heart,
until, in our own despair,
against our will,
comes wisdom
through the awful grace of God.

What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love, and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black.

So I ask you tonight to return home, to say a prayer for the family of Martin Luther King, but more importantly to say a prayer for our own country, which all of us love – a prayer for understanding and that compassion of which I spoke.

We can do well in this country. We will have difficult times. We’ve had difficult times in the past, but we – and we will have difficult times in the future. It is not the end of violence; it is not the end of lawlessness; and it’s not the end of disorder.

But the vast majority of white people and the vast majority of black people in this country want to live together, want to improve the quality of our life, and want justice for all human beings that abide in our land.

And let’s dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world. Let us dedicate ourselves to that, and say a prayer for our country and for our people.

History: The Warmth of Other Suns and The Mind of the South

The past is never dead. It's not even past.

The murder of Trayvon Martin is part of a deeply entrenched and as yet unchanged (other than in the forms it takes) history of racism in the U.S. To explain, I’ll share with you the following article and quotes.

The past is never dead. It’s not even past. — William Faulkner, Requiem for a Nun

In The Warmth of Other Suns, Isabel Wilkerson describes the world of Jim Crow and the Great Migration of black Americans to escape it in the still-bigoted North. One of the central characters of the book is George Swanson Starling, a citrus-picker living in Eustis, Florida.

And Eustis is only about 30 miles from Sanford, where Trayvon Martin was killed.

… breaking from protocol could get people like George killed. Under Jim Crow, only white people could sit in judgment of a colored person on trial. White hearsay had more weight than a colored eyewitness. Colored people had to put on a show of cheerful subservience and unquestioning obedience in the presence of white people or face the consequences of being out of line. If children didn’t learn their place, they could get on the wrong side of a white person, and the parents could do nothing to save them.

George was seeing the world in a new light after being in Detroit. The three of them had gotten used to fair wages for their hard work up north and walked with their backs straight now. George, in particular, never had the constitution to act subservient, and his time up north, where colored people didn’t have to step off the sidewalk, only made him more impatient with the role the southern caste system assigned him.

He had gotten used to carrying himself in a different way, talking to white people as equals in Detroit. Now that he was back in Eustis, he made a point to do whatever he could to keep from addressing white people as “sir” or “ma’am”. “They’d say, ‘So and so and so, boy'” he said. I would never say ‘Yes, sir’ or ‘No, sir.’ I’d say, ‘That’s right.’ ‘Sure.’ ‘Certainly.'”

“What do you mean by *certainly*?” would come the indignant reply. “You don’t know how to say, ‘Yes, sir’?”

George and two friends tried to organize their fellow workers in the orange groves for better and more honest wages. One day a man who worked for one of the white grove owners came to him.

The yard man said he heard mention of a cypress swamp eighteen miles out from town.

“They talking ’bout taking y’all out to Blackwater Creek”, he said. “They talking ’bout giving y’all a necktie party. They gon’ take y’all out there and hang y’all in one of them cypress trees.”

Men had been hanged for far less than what George was orchestrating. And there would be no protecting him if he stayed. In Florida and in the rest of the Deep South, “the killing of a Negro by a white man ceased in practice even to call for legal inquiry,” a white southerner observed in the early 1940s.

That quote is from The Mind of the South by W.J. Cash, who then writes:

But wherever and whenever the forms were still observed, the coroner or jury was all but sure to call it “self-defense” or “justifiable homicide“, and to free the slayer with celerity.

That is part of the history of “self-defense” killings in Florida, and part of the history behind the “Stand Your Ground” law.

SOURCE: http://obsidianwings.blogs.com/obsidian_wings/2012/03/faulkners-past-and-trayvon-martin.html

And so it goes. And goes. And goes. During the next 1000 days and the next 33 months since Michael Jackson’s death, I implore you to DO something. In the name of Michael Jackson for God’s sake DO something to help stop the abuse and the killing. He might have wanted that. Dont you think?

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Mar 11 2012

“Be my eyes and show me everything that I cannot see”

Category: Books,Children,Friends,Interviews,MJ QuotesSeven @ 11:43 am

Michael with photographer John Isaac

This is an interview with photographer John Isaac who shares his memories of working and spending time with Michael. John remembers going to Neverland to photograph Michael and his son Prince, and he remembers a surprise Michael had for his fans at the concert in Milan.

John says he cannot watch the TII film yet because of the immense grief it causes, but says he sometimes sees Michael on a clear, starry night.

[Translated with slight edits to make sense of translation]

Q: When was the first time you saw Michael?

One day I received a phone call. The voice said: “Are you John Isaac?” I said, “Yes” and asked who he was. The voice said: “Michael.” I said “Michael,” The voice said: “Michael Jackson” I said, “Who?” and hung up. A few seconds later the phone rang again, and Bob Jones was wondering why I had hung up the phone on Michael Jackson! I replied: “It was really him?” and handed the phone to Michael. He said he was a fan of my photographs. He bought a poster I created for UNICEF on which featured many children because he loved the pictures and wanted to meet me. He asked if I could go to Neverland and sign the poster. I said I could sign one and send it to New York, but he insisted that I go to Los Angeles. Three days later, they came to the Big Apple to film “They Don’t Care About Us” (prison version) and he invited me and my wife Jeannette to go see the movie. So we went and we met. The next day he asked me to spend the afternoon with him at his hotel in Manhattan and studied my photographic work.

Q: What is the best advice he gave you?

He once told me that I had a knack for photography and should continue to use it to help children around the world. He knew how much I cared about children. I took him to Brazil when they were finishing the video “They Don’t Care About Us“, and he said something I’ll never forget. “John, be my eyes and show me everything that I cannot see.”  I was so excited that I made photos of children in the slums of Rio de Janeiro and Salvador, while they were filming. I travelled in his private plane to Brazil. It was my first trip with him. Michael always supported me, he was aware of my provenance. One day he said we’ve both been to many different places and that is why we both love children. (John Isaac was born in India and spent 20 years working as a photographer of the United Nations, covering countries such as Vietnam, Rwanda, Sarajevo …).

Q: You’ve been to Neverland to take family photos of the first son of Prince Michael and Debbie Rowe. Please tell us more about this experience.

Debbie was not at Neverland, it was just Prince and Michael and I took pictures of father and son. I took the pictures with Debbie at a hotel in Los Angeles. I’ve been twice to Neverland. I drove an electric cart around the farm, saw movies in the theater, climbed on the train. I felt like a kid when I was there! One afternoon we saw a movie together. I was in the suite of Liz Taylor. Michael was very philosophical, often talked about philosophy and life. He asked me to tell him things about the children I had photographed around the world. When I worked for the United Nations, many stories of pain and suffering of all kinds of children. He was always very compassionate towards the less fortunate children.

Q: What is your favorite memory during HIStory World Tour?

At the beginning of the tour in Prague, I think he wanted me to photograph on the stage while he was singing “Heal the World.” I was scared up there in the spotlight with so many fans in front of me, my knees were shaking.  I enjoyed meeting fans around the world while traveling with him. I must say that I met many fine young men. Michael would not have been who he was, if not for all the wonderful fans who adored him so much. Being next to the King of Pop to visit hospitals and orphanages was something I especially appreciated.

Q: How many photographic sessions did you do with Michael Jackson?

I’m not sure how many, but I know there were many. Some special calendars for Sony and other announcements. He also wanted to take pictures with children before each concert.

Q: You told us that Michael had a surprise for fans at the concert in Milan on June 18, 1997: The photo of Michael’s hands and Prince on the screens near the stage. Michael decided to do this? What did he say?

He said it was one of the most special photos I had taken of him and Prince. I captured his hand taking Prince’s hand and he told me that he liked it so much he wanted to show the fans in Milan. It is one of my favorite toos. Michael does not even appear – only his hand protecting Prince.

Q: What picture of Michael do you feel most proud of?

There are many photos that I like, but one I took during a rehearsal in Los Angeles which was published in a special book: Laurent Hopman – Captain Eo Productions (program memory HIStory World Tour – Limited Edition). Michael is at center stage and all the dancers are around with different poses, rehearsing. It looks like a painting. Michael really liked this photo too. All dressed in casual clothes. I have no copy of this negative image because I gave them all to Michael.

Q: Why does it sometimes take three cameras at the same time? Did Michael wanted special pictures? It also seemed that he took more photos of fans than himself?

I remember that he wanted every moment of his life to be saved. Sometimes he wanted a black and white and the other two cameras were color photos. Today, with digital technology, you can convert the color to black and white with no problem, but with the old negatives it was more complicated. I also had three different types of lenses, so I could shoot quickly without having to change them. After a first selection on my part, Michael chose his favorite, and he had good taste selecting the photos! Michael was delighted to see the photos of his fans. They were very important to him.

Q: How did you hear of his sudden death, what was your reaction?

I saw it on TV. I was very, very sad. I felt so sorry that it happened so soon. However, I know he’s up there shining like a star. Every time I see a clear sky at night, I see Michael.

Q: Have you seen the movie Michael Jackson “This Is It“? can you comment on that?

My wife bought me the DVD. I’ve only seen parts of it and I grieved Michael’s death so much that I could not keep watching. Maybe one day I will see it to the end.

Q: What are your plans for the future, John Isaac?

I am finishing a documentary about myself as a photographer. In Japan I’ve been documenting on the survivors of the recent tsunami. While I was in Japan, I met some of Michael’s fans who were very friendly. In addition, Kodak House is preparing a permanent collection of my photographs in their museum. Unfortunately, I have no footage of what I did for Michael on tour or with Michael’s baby. I gave them all to his managers.

Edited and Translated from:
http://wwwyouaremylife-jaqueline.blogspot.com/2011/11/john-seja-meus-olhos-e-me-mostre-tudo-o.html

John’s life story and his wonderful photography:
http://askthephotographer.com/2008/12/31/photographer-profile-john-isaac/

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{ Thanks to our wonderful friends at UK Loves MJ for sharing this story! -Seven }

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Feb 20 2012

“They Covered Up a Lot”

Category: Books,Family,Humanitarian,Justice,VideosSeven @ 11:53 pm

Michael and Jermaine Jackson

No, it wasn’t OK. I’m not going to pretend that it was. I never have and I never will.

People just weren’t allowed to say anything. They had them on ‘lockdown‘, including Michael. We’ve heard about that from multiple quarters. The film (This Is It), created by camera people hired and using equipment purchased by AEG, was not Michael’s and not Michael’s idea. Yes he would typically film rehearsals and performances so he could watch them later and improve his work. But this time it wasn’t his people or his cameras. What we heard from Kenny Ortega and Randy Phillips during rehearsals compared with what we heard later, particularly from Kenny Ortega in the courtroom during the Murray trial, should have told anyone listening that no, it wasn’t OK and no, they didn’t “have it under control“. Nowhere near it.

Who hired Conrad Murray? It really doesn’t matter who hired Murray. What matters is that Michael needed to sleep and no one around him cared if or how he did it. Including Conrad Murray, obviously. And that was the problem. It doesn’t matter because between Tohme Tohme and AEG, there was no way Michael’s family or anyone else who would listen to him or could help would be allowed near him, no matter what was going on. And Michael himself certainly didn’t want anyone else to know he was using propofol to sleep, either.

I constantly hear: “Well why didn’t so-and-so “do anything” when they were there in rehearsals and saw what was going on?”  But in my own opinion, dancers, make-up artists and the like had neither the responsibility or the authority to “do anything” other than alert those in charge. And they did. And they were told it was “under control“. The next thing we all knew Michael was gone.

I don’t blame Michael’s family. I don’t blame the dancers, his make-up artists, his security detail, or his costumers. I put the blame squarely on the shoulders of those who negotiated that contract with AEG and those were in charge of that production. They know who they are. Anyone who gave a damn about anything besides themselves, the show and profits; anyone who could help Michael was flatly denied access. That’s the way they wanted it. It was as if he was some stolen crown jewel being guarded by hungry lions belonging to the thieves. No one could get near him to return him to anyone who cared for him.

If you haven’t read Jermaine Jackson’s book, I highly recommend it. I also highly recommend LaToya’s book. I recommend these because they are written by his own brother and sister and whether you like it or not, no one knew Michael better than his own family. They know his childhood and the history of his adolescence and young adulthood better than anyone else. They were there most of this time, unlike the media and various unscrupulous authors. These are authentic keys to who Michael was as a person. Jermaine’s book in particular lovingly puts truth to much if not all of the media lies about Michael. It is truly a treasure. Even knowing that the media’s claims were not true  (I didn’t need proof of that myself), I still felt that I knew Michael much better after reading Jermaine’s book.

I know Jermaine, Michael and LaToya have had issues in the past. However, it is my own belief that these issues were put behind them long before Michael died. It is my belief that Michael forgave them and that all was settled. And if that was good enough for Michael, it’s good enough for me. I won’t discount some of these books based on grudges against this family when they are valuable snapshots of who Michael was — snapshots that no one other than his own family can provide. They’re important books if you want to know Michael.

I bring up Jermaine because if you haven’t read and listened to the following interview yet, you must. It was inexplicably dropped by the Huffington Post back in September 2011. They simply never published it and apparently gave no reason whatsoever. This was during the controversy that the media created surrounding Jermaine’s book wherein they typically misquoted what he had written  about the 2005 trial. The planned tribute concert in Cardiff had caused a rift in the Jackson family at that time, and the Conrad Murray trial was about to start in mere days. Charles Thomson’s interview with Jermaine provides a glimpse into his state of mind at the time. Now, five months later, we can finally read and hear it.  I think this interview and Jermaine’s book are very important for anyone seeking the truth about Michael, the media, and how Michael was treated during his life and particularly just before his death by the media and others around him.  Some excerpts and audio from the interview follow:

The assumption by many that they know more about Michael than his own family is a bug-bear of Jermaine’s. This attitude, he says, is the result of a decades-long battle against inaccurate media coverage. “This would become a recurring theme for the family,” he writes in the book, “a showdown of fact versus perception – and fact would always be the underdog.”

. . .

The book has been mired in controversy. As Jermaine flew to London, a storm was brewing over a portion of his prologue. Writing about his brother’s 2005 child molestation trial, Jermaine wrote that he was paranoid Michael would fall victim to a terrible injustice, so he hatched a secret escape plan. He arranged for a private jet to be on standby at the nearest airport, ready to whisk his brother to Bahrain if things looked bleak.

But many journalists, apparently too lazy even to read Jermaine’s nine-page prologue before writing about it, got it monumentally wrong. It all started when one story misquoted the prologue and said the Jackson family had planned to spirit Michael away to the Middle East after he was convicted. Copy-and-paste journalism took hold and the story was replicated hundreds of times by newspapers and websites including the New York Post, NY Daily News, Denver Post and Washington Times. Even the Press Association got it wrong.

The nonsensical story made Jermaine’s book look like a work of fiction, a situation worsened when Michael’s 2005 defense attorney Thomas Mesereau publicly blasted the claim.

“One of the reasons I wrote the book was so that my words would stand for themselves, in context,” says Jermaine. “But even in the newspapers’ coverage of my book my words were misreported. There was never a plan to get Michael out of the country ‘if convicted’. Thomas Mesereau had to issue a denial based on something that wasn’t true in the first place. That one change of context showed how one inaccuracy can snowball and how myths are made. I sat back and thought ‘This is what Michael faced all the time’.”

Read more here: http://www.orchardtimes.com/exclusive-jermaine-jackson-interview, and listen to the audio below and more on Charles Thomson’s YouTube Channel.

There are others who are to blame for making Michael Jackson’s life a living Hell before he died. And much of what they did and the reasons they did it are rooted in the same ages-old greed, lust for power and racism that drove Hitler and his Ministry of Propaganda against the Jews – and against black people. This brand of putrid racism still exists today. Far from being anti-semitic, Michael understood all too well the persecution of the Jewish people because he felt so much of it himself during his own lifetime.

Besides being a musical genius, Michael was a revolutionary. He was also one of the biggest forgotten humanitarians of all time. But both his creative and humanitarian work has been successfully buried beneath negative propaganda and innuendo that would astonish Hitler and Goebbels, the forefathers of these tactics. There are various reasons for this. He bucked the system from the get-go. His artistic brilliance enabled him to succeed in spite of an aborted childhood, an abusive father and physical and emotional neglect. As an adult he asserted his freedom, both legal and creative. He was wildly successful, making himself a millionaire before the age of 30. He broke the white establishment’s rules and their records left and right, and then he broke his own records. And yet he was black. Even after he ‘turned white‘ from vitiligo, he was still black. And while that confused and confounded others about who Michael Jackson was and they subsequently projected that confusion onto him — Michael himself was never confused about his own identity.

He fought back against the persecution brought against him for not forcing himself into society’s box – the one pre-made for him when he was born poor and black. See, he was supposed to stay that way. But he didn’t.

He didn’t fight back with guns, violence, crime, or political movements but rather with his music, film, dance, and countless humanitarian efforts. He knew these had more power and were much more inclusive. He rebelled and while the propaganda machine used every weapon in its arsenal to distract everyone from his messages and they were mostly successful — some of us still heard it. Some of us understood it. And we understood the reasons behind it. Many of us experienced the same kinds of persecution in our own lives albiet on a smaller scale. We could relate!

If the rest of the world had any clue, it should be ashamed. Michael’s premature death from the human rights abuses he incessantly suffered right up to his very last breath are an indelible bloodstain humanity will bear on its face forever. Anyone who has any interest whatsoever in changing humanity can start by learning what this man’s music was really all about, particularly the most discounted, despised and criticized of it – that he created after he became hugely famous with ‘Thriller‘.

There’s a lot that too many people don’t know about Michael Jackson. And they need to know. Humanity will not change until and unless it can first face its mistakes,its ignorance, its gullible penchant for unquestioningly swallowing propaganda wholesale – and the shame that should rightly come along with all of that. And until it can finally see beyond this to the strength and beauty it daily disses in this world – not just in Michael Jackson but in itself – in all of humanity. The first step is to take the blinders off and start looking beyond the lies we’re being fed every day.

Michael saw it, that strength and beauty. He believed in it. He believed in himself and he believed in the rest of us. Even after he was so badly betrayed by so many people. As jacked as it sounds, the whole system sucks. But it doesn’t have to. Don’t keep these things in an echo chamber. Share them with everyone. There are many eyes to open, much shame to be reconciled, and much beauty to see – everywhere. But we have to expose the ugliness first in order to clear the view.

The videos below were created by the Michael Jackson Academia Project. Their channel on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/TheMJAcademiaProject

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